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Don’t trust your parents

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Compared to the rest of the world, it’s not a bad family situation. Still, it has its quirks.

Neither parent (political party) likes each other. And every 4 years or so Mom or Dad gets a new boyfriend or girlfriend to add to the dysfunction. This move-in parent always seems to take charge. Sometimes they stick around for 8 years. Eventually they leave and a new partner moves in.

Having estranged parents is mostly chaotic – both sides always fighting and blaming one another. Neither parent likes to take responsibility. This dysfunction continues decade after decade, always spending more money than they make while piling one year’s debt on top of another.

Because they have lots of kids (people like you and me), and they run around with other parents (foreign nations), they always seem to find new sources to borrow more money. 

Occasionally when things get really bad – in surprise fashion, the parents come together and try to take care of the kids – even if it means sacrificing their own finances to another level.

After all, If your family is in a crisis, you don’t worry about expense. You throw whatever dollars you can at the problem.

But this isn’t always easy, at least not in a way that seems fair to both sides. This usually results in some really extravagant gifts – sort of like taking the kids to Disney or to the amusement park to make up for all their fighting and parent neglect.

Things get complicated in a blended family. Mom and Dad have their favorites, right? And which kids really need the help? No matter how hard they try, some family members will get more than others… and that’s when the gloves come off.

Pay attention over the next days (maybe weeks) as Mom and Dad bicker over the money being promised to help the family, with money they don’t really have. Just days ago I heard President Trump (I guess that would be “Mom’s boyfriend” in the crazy illustration) mention sending help to Airlines, Hotels and Cruise Lines. That’s an interesting Top 3.

Also kids, you’ve probably heard the parents (again, our government) are putting some cash gifts in the mail for us.

They’ll be arriving soon. I suggest we use them wisely. If you need it for daily food and housing, I’m so glad you’re getting this help.

If you don’t need it for day-to-day living, I suggest throwing it at some debt. Or stick it in the bank. Or help out a friend or neighbor in need.

Mom and Dad mean well, but their financial habits won’t work forever. There might come a day when they won’t be able to help us. Be thoughtful about this cash gift.

I’m glad my trust is not in my parents. For Christians, our trust is in God.

In God we trust.